St Ninian

Saint Ninian, bishop, missionary, and apostle to Scotland, drawn and painted in the style of a early medieval illuminated manuscript. Inspired by the Book of Kells, the ruins of Whithorn Abbey, and artifacts such as the clog-rinny (the Bell of St Ninian).

Re-imaging the Book of Durrow: the opening double pages of Luke’s Gospel

It is difficult for people in the 21st century, routinely surrounded by colours of every hue, to imagine how the sight of the Book of Durrow would have affected viewers in the late 600s AD. I have attempted to convey some of this wonder by recreating pages in watercolour and ink using modern lightfast organic pigments augmented with raised gesso and 24 carat gold leaf in the manner of later medieval illuminated manuscripts.

While this treatment may seem like heresy to some, I argue that my own experience when I first witnessed the transformation that the addition of polished gold brought to the designs was a valuable addition to my understanding of the experiences of 7th century and later early medieval viewers of these books. The addition of polished gold leaf not only adds the experience of ‘the Light of the World’ reflecting out of each page, but it also helps tie the designs more firmly to the Eastern manuscript traditions of Byzantine and Greek Orthodox religious art.

Re-imagining Luke’s Incipit Pages in the Book of Durrow

This is a further attempt at reproducing a double page illumination from the Book of Durrow in modern organic watercolour pigments similar in tone to how the pages might have looked when first illuminated back around 680 AD.

I have again embellished some areas of the illumination with raised gesso and 24 carat gold leaf in an attempt to give modern eyes the sense of awe and wonder that the original manuscript might have induced in the world of mainly muted tones in the 7th century.

Clock face design in vector

I like endless knotwork, and create modern and abstract designs for circles, in vector 3 dimensional graphics. The dimension are infinite, dependent on scale, just like text is on a computer. The three dimensions are height width and depth, the depth being how near or far away the object is… hence its size, relative to position in space. The smallest object one can place at a point in space ( the point is an independent mathematical scale ) is a pixel. Pixels cannot overlap two dimensionally – but can in three dimensions. For graphics on a PC screen or TV, one uses just two dimensions for the pixel placement, and the third dimension is how near or far away from it one is.

i explore all kinds of abstract and traditional celtic knotwork designs, but favour the ability of computer graphics for vector work, since my hands cannot reliably reproduce the spatial accuracy needed. I use a laser to cut such designs in wood and the lines are accurate to 1/3rd, to 1/5th of a mm .

Alpha et Omega

From the book of Revelation, Chapter 22 Verse 13  ‘I am the Alpha and the Omega,  the first and the last, the beginning and the end’. Rendered as another folio in the Lindesfarne Gospel. The text is in two styles, Greek and one imitating those of the other pages of the manuscript. This is a Digital Vector Illustration.