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 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
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Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: three birds entangled
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View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
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Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: detail of front of bird's wing
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Details: detail of reverse of bird's wing

Work in progress

Object number: ROMGH.1999.349

Type: Wall hanging

Technique: Embroidered

Material: Textile

Width: 51.5cm | Height: 167cm

Production date: 1920 - 1968

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

George Bain, his daughter Claire, or one of his students, has chosen a large length of fairly coarse, grey-brown linen for this work. In fact, the material is so heavy and dull in colour that we don’t know if it really was intended for a wall hanging. Perhaps each circle was to be cut out once embroidered and used as a placemat.

The prepared designs have been drawn onto the cloth. Three patterns are outlined in pencil, but only one has been started. Two are of the Aberlemno triskeles (three-in-one spirals), carved into the centre of the Pictish cross in the graveyard. The other is of three intertwined birds, their talons interlocked at the middle of the roundel. Each bird has a different design on its wing. They are loosely based on similar examples in the Book of Kells.

Author: Barbara Pritchard

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