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Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
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Details: Logo in pencil [ROMGH.2005.5.8.101.2]
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Details: Inked-up logo [ROMGH.2005.5.8.101.5B]
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Details: Another coloured logo [ROMGH.2005.5.8.101.5A]
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Details: Another logo design in pencil [ROMGH.2005.5.8.101.3]

Time for a logo

Object number: ROMGH.2005.5.8.101.4

Type: Drawing

Technique: Painted

Material: Crayon, Paper, Watercolour

Width: 12cm | Height: 15cm

Production date: 1945 - 1952

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Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

In the late 1940s and early 1950s George Bain was advising the Kidderminster carpet firm of Quayle & Tranter Ltd. It seems that they asked Bain to produce some designs for a logo for the company. In our collection there are four different drafts. This design was the only one of them in which Bain tried to incorporate some Celtic ornament in the form of very angular knotwork.

It’s a shame, but there is no evidence that any of the logo designs were used by the firm. However, Bain supplied several rug designs, some of which were actually commercially produced. Quayle and Tranter also used other Celtic designs for their manufacture of carpets.

Author: Alastair Morton

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