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 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
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Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: side with embossed key pattern

Patterns in bright green

Object number: ROMGH.1999.354

Type: Handbag

Technique: Embossed, Stitched

Material: Leather

Width: 18.8cm | Depth: 3cm

Production date: 1920 - 1968

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

This leather handbag was designed by George Bain but possibly made by one of his students or a member of his family. Using bold, bright green paint on the inserted leather panels highlights the embossed designs. On one side is a complex of embossed spirals, a design that is repeated on another of his bags. On the other is a series of key patterns.

The spirals are in an interlinked group of seven, set in a circle. This design is a mirror image of that at the centre of the cross on the Pictish Aberlemno cross-slab which stands in the churchyard. There, the three strand spirals (triskeles) turn clockwise. However, on the handbag they move anti-clockwise. The design on the other side of the bag is from Bain’s reconstruction of the key-pattern on the Pictish Collieburn cross-slab.

Bain often uses specific details from both Pictish stones in his Methods of Construction. He clearly studied them in great detail, but probably did so from early-20th century book illustrations. Travelling to visit them was difficult in the 1920s and 1930s.

See Bain's Celtic Art, Methods of Construction pages 60 & 62; pages 74 & 79

Author: Diana Cobden

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