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Details: another of the set
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Details: the set of six

Knotwork place mats

Object number: ROMGH.1998.36

Type: Place mat

Technique: Embroidered

Material: Textile

Width: 17.5cm

Production date: 1920 - 1968

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

George Bain explored how Celtic interlaced designs on sculpture and other objects could be translated into embroidery. The pattern on this small, circular place mat was created by him. It was transferred onto cloth so that a set of six could be made. We presume they were embroidered by one of his students, either in Kirkcaldy or Glen Urquhart.

Light and dark blue chain stitch forms two endless knotwork strands. Accents are added in turquoise satin stitch. The cloth has then been carefully edged in white blanket stitch. It’s finished with a separate border in fawn, either created using picot stitch or by tatting.

More complex embroideries, sewn by needlework pupils at Kirkcaldy High School, were included in a display at Glasgow’s Empire Exhibition in 1938. As well as sponsoring the Exhibition, J&P Coates Ltd of Paisley organised their own display stands for an International Collection of Embroideries. It included work by the school using Bain’s designs.

Author: Barbara Pritchard

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