...
Image copyright information
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: design around gusset of handbag
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: key pattern on other side of handbag

Jessie’s handbag

Object number: ROMGH.1999.353

Type: Handbag

Technique: Embossed, Stitched

Material: Leather

Width: 40cm | Depth: 15.5cm

Production date: 1937

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

This hand-tooled, leather handbag belonged to Jessie, George Bain’s wife. The two tags on its zip are embossed with interlace on one side and either JB or 1937 on the other. So it seems very likely that Bain made the bag for her. 

All of the faces of the handbag are embossed with differing Celtic designs. One of the circular sides has a complex key pattern which is based on Pictish originals. The other side has four linked interlaced Celtic knotwork circles on it. The gusset, which creates the width of the bag, is also embossed with interlace.

All of the separate pieces have been joined together by hand using thin strips of leather. They are stitched so that the seam looks like knotwork. Even the narrow plaited strap is decorated with two small discs that are embossed with knotwork. Such rich and varied decoration reflects Bain’s philosophy of adapting Celtic art for modern use.

Author: Diana Cobden

Have you been inspired?

Have you taken inspiration from this artwork for your own practice? If so, you can submit your own work here.

Upload your artwork here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.