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Image copyright information
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: George Bain's caption for this poster

Carpet page of knotwork

Object number: ROMGH.1998.133

Type: Poster

Material: Ballpoint pen, Paper, Pencil

Width: 53.7cm | Height: 83.8cm

Production date: 1946 - 1968

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

This large drawing is one of Bain’s numerous posters, produced as teaching or lecture aids. It focuses on the various knotwork panels of a page in the Book of Durrow. Near the top left corner Bain fully colours a small part of the design. By spreading apart the interlaced strands he highlights the saltire cross at the centre of the knotwork motif.

The same knotwork motif is repeated eight times at a larger scale in the centre of the page. Three differently shaped crosses are highlighted in white, one above the other down the middle. They reflect the Christian trinity of God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

Bain’s script, along the right side, highlights a link between the Book of Durrow and St Columba. It refers to an inscription on folio 247v, implying that the saint created the book of gospels. Nowadays it is thought that the name of Columba was added much later.

The religious community that held the Book of Durrow at the time must have changed the original text. Presumably it wanted to show a direct link to the greatly revered St Columba. The original word me (referring to the book’s scribe) was scraped or worn away and overwritten with Columba.

Author: Alastair Morton

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