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View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
 Yes you can     No you cannot
View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: two beard-pullers in close-up
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View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
Share, download and use this picture No
Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: beard-puller and bird interlaced, close-up
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View this picture on the internet for enjoyment and inspiration Yes
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Use the picture for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Details: four beard-pullers in detail

Colourful beard-pullers

Object number: ROMGH.1998.137

Type: Poster

Technique: Drawn

Material: Ballpoint pen, Crayon, Paper

Width: 52cm | Height: 63cm

Production date: 1946 - 1962

 Yes you can     No you cannot
Use the same Celtic patterns in your art and craft work Yes
Use this design for commercial purposes without the permission of the Copyright holder No
Commercially reproduce this object without the permission of the Copyright holder No

George Bain clearly enjoyed bringing these fantastic beard-pullers to life. He enlarged them from their original size in the Book of Kells, so that we can read them clearly. He has used his earlier pencil studies of these panels to re-draw them and then colour them in biro and crayon. His vibrant colours help us understand the imagery.

Bain has added a lot of explanatory notes to help the viewer follow the interlacings. The two smaller designs are from one of the Eusebian Canons at the start of the Book of Kells. The larger panel is from a page in its St Matthew’s gospel. For reference he shows the actual size of each. That on the right is 14 times larger than drawn by the scribe in the monastery where it was created. Those on the left are 9 times bigger.

TCD MS58 folio 34r Trinity College Dublin and TCD MS58 folio 5r Trinity College Dublin

Author: Jill Harden

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